Pull marks

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Gatorfan316
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Pull marks

Postby Gatorfan316 » Sat Aug 25, 2012 11:14 am

I am new to reloading and recently go a great deal on some 162 grain 30.06 bullets (mil surp) but they have pull marks on them. Some are just light scarring and some are slightly deeper so that you can barely feel them with your fingernail. Will these pull marks affect the load process or the performance of the round?

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Hakaman
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Postby Hakaman » Sat Aug 25, 2012 12:13 pm

Not the most experienced reloader, but I would say no it doesn't matter. The basis for my thought is what happens to a bullet when it is fired? It gets heavily rifled as it goes through the barrel, and it is 'pulled' out of the brass at that time. It doesn't sound like the marks are too bad at all, and for military surplus I wouldn't think they would shoot as well as match ammo anyway. If you want accuracy, you should invest in match ammo. You didn't say what you were going to use them for, competitive shooting, hunting, etc. Most people can't shoot as well as their guns and ammo anyway. I personally would not hesitate to use them.
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Bullseye
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Postby Bullseye » Sat Aug 25, 2012 12:54 pm

Welcome Gatorfan!

Pullet performance could be effected if the marks are in a critical area, the bullet's nose would be a good example. What kind of pull marks are these? What do you intend to use these reloaded rounds for shooting-wise? Were the bullets collet pulled and the collet fingers were just overtightened?

Many military manufactured rounds have a laquer seal applied to both the bullets and the primers to keep out moisture. This seal often makes them more difficult to pull out and therefore require more force to accomplish the task. Sometimes this leaves some marks on the ogive of the bullet which doesn't generally impact the bullet's flight.

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Gatorfan316
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Postby Gatorfan316 » Sat Aug 25, 2012 1:42 pm

I am going to use them for just shooting to keep up to par. We all know the longer you go between shoots the more your performance drops.

The marks are around midway up the bullet where the brass is crimped but doesn't go completely to the bottom of the base.

The nose down to the crimp area is in excellent condition.

But the main purpose in my buying these bullets is get some reloading under my belt, figure out a good load recipe and to just stay up on my shooting.

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Hakaman
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Postby Hakaman » Sat Aug 25, 2012 1:46 pm

But the main purpose in my buying these bullets is get some reloading under my belt, figure out a good load recipe and to just stay up on my shooting.
From this statement you pretty much say you are not too concerned with high accuracy, as in competitive shooting, more for keeping some basic shooting skills honed. Again, I think they would be just fine and a good buy.

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Postby blue68f100 » Sat Aug 25, 2012 2:00 pm

Pull bullets are OK for most general shooting. If you want high accuracy you must go a Match grade bullets with all of the other required steps. These will be fine to help you refine your reloading skills. On rifle loads it's all the brass prep that take all the time.

Be safe. If in doubt ask.
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Gatorfan316
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Postby Gatorfan316 » Sat Aug 25, 2012 2:08 pm

Roger that and thanks guys.

I have been saving my brass for some time and have no problems there. I have been shopping around and have found some high quality bullets to swap over to once I run through this mil-surp and have a good load recipe figured out.

The mil-surp bullets are 162 grain and the higher quality bullets I am looking at are 165 and 168 grain so only some minor tweaks should be required to have some accurate reloaded ammo.

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Postby Bullseye » Sat Aug 25, 2012 4:44 pm

Are you shooting .30-06 or .308 cases? Are you making some "Mexican Match" or are you entirely reloading the cases? You going to shoot these in a Garand?

Your pulled surplus bullets will be fine. If the marks are below the cannelure they definitely won't affect accruacy. Like Hakaman said that is the part that the rifling grabs and grooves are imparted on the bullet in this area by passing through the barrel.

I like to use the 168 sierra's in my .308 loads. 150's work pretty well if you're using .30-06, that was the standard bullet used in M2 Ball.

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