Single or Double Trigger?

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charlesb
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Single or Double Trigger?

Post by charlesb » Sun May 27, 2012 4:42 pm

I do not know much about shotguns but intend to buy one soon. I will be moving to an area with a large tract of land available for year-round shotgun-only hunting.

One of the guns that I am considering are 28 gauge side-by-side double, with double triggers. The action is scaled to size of the shell on this model.

http://www.cz-usa.com/products/view/bob ... -hardened/

This is the single-trigger model:

http://www.cz-usa.com/products/view/rin ... ight-grip/

The game will be rabbits, doves, squirrels, quail and maybe a snake every now and then.

Anyway; I don't know much about shotguns, and am uncertain which gun to order.

Would somebody fill me in on how the single-trigger works, etc.?

The reason I am looking at a double-trigger gun is that I am unfamiliar with the new single triggers, and how they are used. The gun will have to be ordered sight-unseen, so I'll have to do all of my figuring ahead of time.

PS: I understand about the cost of 28 ga. shells, and am already looking at a reloading setup on account of that. - They ought to be fairly cheap to reload.

Thank you!

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Post by blue68f100 » Sun May 27, 2012 7:04 pm

My Citori S/S has a single trigger. With single triggers you have a selector which allows you to select which barrel you want to shoot first. You don't have the option to fire both barrels at the same time. The reason I say this is my brother has large hands and most of the time he would do this no knowing it. His finger would hook the second trigger when he squeezed the trigger off the first one. I never had that problem but I have small hands.

After using both I prefer the single trigger. A little quicker if you need the second shot.

Reloading Shotgun shells is not quite a cost savings when compared to center fire. With the cost of shot being the main expense, ~$40/25#bag (lead). Now this is for light filed loads. Once you move to High Brass it a pretty decent savings.
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Post by charlesb » Sun May 27, 2012 8:21 pm

I appreciate the information... I have large hands, and these 28 ga. guns are smaller than usual. - I probably should consider the single trigger model.

Looking around, I was surprised to discover several guns available in 28 ga.. The Remington pump and auto are both available in 28, for example.

If the Remington auto is scaled-down like the CZ doubles, that would be a fun gun, good for quail.

I have hunted places like I will be moving to before, years ago... There's a lot more walking involved than anything else, so I want the lightest, handiest thing that will do the job without kicking too bad. - I'm getting on in years, and my wife likes to shoot - but nothing that kicks very much.

I guess the thing to do now is to find a CZ shotgun forum and see what kind of impression those particular guns have made upon their owners.

I know about the CZ rifles and have owned a couple of them, but I don't know anything about the shotguns except that they look nice on the web-site.

I've had a couple of the CZ Mini-Mausers, a sporter in .222 Rem and also a varmint model with a heavy barrel in .223 Rem - and both guns were very nice.

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Post by blue68f100 » Sun May 27, 2012 10:37 pm

Mt brothers hands/finger are very large/long, can reach an octave and half on the ivories. So if you have normal length fingers the doubles may work, but if fat/large finger you will have limited room.
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SS MKIII 6 7/8" Fluted Hunter. Mueller Quick Shot, Bushnell 2x Scope, Hogue Rubber Grips
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Post by Bullseye » Mon May 28, 2012 8:10 am

When I was in my teens, I used to have an old 1900 Remington twin trigger SxS double barrel 12 gauge, and on one duck hunting trip nearly overturned the canoe by accidentally firing both barrels. It is easy to do when you're concentrating/focused on something else.

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Post by charlesb » Tue May 29, 2012 9:01 pm

If I get a double, I'm definitely going with the single-trigger, even though they cost a bit more.

I have big hands with sausage-like fingers.

( Click the image to see the big hand even bigger )

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Post by charlesb » Tue Jul 10, 2012 11:18 pm

I just wanted to note that I have found a few more interesting 28ga shotguns to consider.

Browning makes a 28ga pump that feeds and ejects out of the bottom, has great fit and finish, and costs about the same or a little less than the Remington pump.

I have also found that used Beretta over/unders of fine quality can be had for around 1G - about the same price as a new Remington 1100 auto in the same gauge.

One strange thing that I have noticed is that a lot of fixed-choke barrels for Remington 28ga autos are on the auction sites. - Maybe the screw-in choke barrels for them recently became available, or something like that.

Most of the 28ga guns on the online auction sites are way too expensive. I can only look at maybe one out of ten from the guns that are there, as I hope to keep the tariff under 1.2 kilobux unless I run across some kind of real bargain on something a little nicer.

Apparently 28ga is popular with grouse hunters, I see a lot of them with grouse engraving, inlays, medallions, you name it. For my part, I wouldn't know a grouse if I saw one. - They look kind of like quail to me, but maybe a bit bigger?

I don't want the gun to be so nice that I'd be afraid to go scratch it up in the field - but I do acknowledge the fact that I will spend a lot more time admiring the gun than I will shooting it.

All of the ones that I have looked at have been purdy, though... I guess the ugliest one would be the Remington 870, and that's a really good-looking gun.

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Update

Post by charlesb » Sun Aug 12, 2012 5:55 pm

In the long run, I ended up purchasing a 20ga shotgun, a CZ 'Canvasback' over/under.

- With a single-selective trigger, extractors and a set of choke tubes.

I fired it at an oil can that my son tossed up when I got it home, checking it for function. Tomorrow morning I will lay in wait for some unsuspecting bird, probably a grackle.

I looked at the bargain O/U guns and liked this one best of the ones that I got a chance to look at.

http://www.cz-usa.com/products/view/canvasback-103-d/

Mine is 20ga, with 28" barrels.

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